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Thread: COP For Dummies! Version 2.0

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    Default COP For Dummies! NEW! Version 2.0



    COP for Dummies
    Version 2.0

    INTRODUCTION
    This guide is intended to be a quick reference guide to understanding the Code of Points (COP) system currently being used in Figure Skating in "easy to understand" terms. It should be used as such. It is not a comprehensive guide or a detailed listing of everything in regards to COP. If you wish to understand everything there is to know about COP please visit http://www.isu.org and look for their Communications Sheets to explain in great detail the nuances of this judging system. Everything to know about COP is not in this guide. This guide is targeted at people who wish to understand the basics of COP and to gain insight as to how scores are produced.

    COP is the new cumulative points scoring system that was first used as a test-run during the Grand Prix Series during the 2003-2004 season. Unlike the old Ordinal System, commonly referred to as 6.0, COP does not try to determine placements. Rather it assigns points and point totals to produce a winner. Under the Ordinal System judges assigned 2 marks to give an ordinal, a skaters placement relative to every other skater. The numbers themselves were not set, rather they showed a skaters overall performance comparative to the rest of the field. What COP intends to do is show an indicative, quantified number that can be compared from any skater to any competition with the use of point totals.

    COP is still being changed season to season. What is true for this season may not exist in the next. New rules may be added, subject to change, or removed. This guide is written in context to the 2005-2006 season. Since my area of expertise is the Ladies and Mens events, those get the most attention first. There is documentation here in regards to Pairs but it is limited. As I am not a fan of Ice Dancing and don't follow it to any degree, this guide does not include that discipline. If anyone wishes to make their own guide for Ice Dancing, or add their information to this one, it would be greatly appreciated.
    THE BASICS
    Any program under COP uses a Protocol Sheet to show the program and how it was assessed by the judges. Every program has the following areas listed.

    TSS - Total Segment Score: This is the total score of the program
    TES - Technical Element Score: This is the score of the elements
    PCS - Program Component Score: This is the score of the non-elements

    As usual there are two programs during a competition normally. The Short Program and the Long Program. The short program is still the same as it was under the Ordinal System, with 8 required element. The Long Program has changed somewhat in it's overall composition, but nevertheless remains almost the same.

    A program is judged in a unique way now. There are three different ways the program and performance are judged and I will go briefly into each one. The Technical Specialist (a seperate judge so to speak) identifies each element and inputs it. Then the judges on the panel assess the quaity of that element and gives it a Grade Of Execution (GOE). Finally, the judges assess how well the non-technical elements were done and assign them a score. The specifics of each are detailed as follows.


    NOTE: Foamy and Pilz-y, as they appear on my covers, are owned by Jonathan Ian Mathers, also known as IllWillPress. I do not own them. They are not mine and if so requested I will change back to the old (but boring) covers instead.
    Last edited by KwanBoy23; November 24th, 2005 at 02:28 AM.

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    Default COP For Dummies! TES & GOE

    TECHNICAL ELEMENTS

    Technical Elements are the various multi-rotational jumps, spins, footwork and spiral sequences performed as well as the lifts, twist lifts, and death spirals performed by Pairs. In the short program there are 7 required technical elements that must be performed:


    • LADIES
    Double or Triple Axel
    Triple/Double or Triple/Triple combination
    Triple jump preceded by footwork or other connecting steps
    Layback Spin
    Flying Spin
    Spin Combination
    Step Sequence
    • MEN
    Double or Triple Axel
    Triple/Double, Triple/Triple, Quadruple/Double or Quadruple Triple combination
    Triple or Quadruple jump preceded by footwork or other connecting steps
    Spin with one change of foot and no change of position
    Flying Spin
    Spin Combination
    Step Sequence
    Any particular triple or quadruple jump cannot be repeated in the short program unless that jump is performed twice in the combination only. The only possible combinations possible that allow this are the triple toe/triple toe and triple loop/triple loop. For the men, the single position spin and flying spin MUST have different basic positions or the element isn't counted and zero points are awarded. For example, if a skater does a death drop back sit spin as their flying spin, the they cannot do a sit/back sit or back sit/sit spin as the change foot spin.

    For the long program there is a maximum number of Technical Elements allowed and the majority of skaters use all available Technical Elements. They are as follows:


    • LADIES
    7 Jumping Passes
    3 Spins
    1 Step Sequence
    • MEN
    8 Jumping Passes
    3 Spins
    1 Step Sequences
    • PAIRS
    3 Lifts including 1 from Group 3 or 4 (More on that later)
    1 Twist Lift
    2 Different Throw Jumps
    1 Side-by-Side Jump
    1 Side-by-Side Jump Combination or Sequence
    1 Side-by-Side Spin Combination
    1 Pair Spin Combination
    1 Death Spiral
    1 Step Sequence or Spiral Sequence
    For both Ladies and Men one jumping pass must consist of an axel jump. It doesn't matter whether it is a single, double, or triple. It can be performed alone, in combination, or sequence.
    Jump Combinations and Sequences count as a single jumping pass. For both Ladies and Men, 1 Combination or Sequence is required but up to 3 combinations or sequences may be performed. Only one jumping pass is allowed to contain 3 multi-rotational jumps.
    For Spins, one must have a flying entrance, and another must be a spin combination with at least 2 changes of position and one change of foot. The third spin can be one of any chosing but may not be the same spin as one already performed.
    For men the two Step Sequences must be of different patterns.

    All Technical Elements have a Base Mark that is assigned to the element. This number is always rounded to the nearest hundredth.

    Please note that all Jumps and Elements are discussed first in corrolation to the Singles discipline first. Pairs Skating is covered in a seperate section.
    GRADE OF EXECUTION (GOE)
    All technical elements receive a GOE score from the judges ranging from -3 (done very poorly) to 0 (done adequately) to +3 (done exceptionally well). The criteria for GOE depends on the element. A GOE of 0 means the element received its base value. Though the ranking of GOE can be -3 to +3, depending upon the base value of the element, the bonus or deduction for GOE can be anywhere from 0.3 to 1.0 for each + or - accumulated. Any positive or negative skills demonstrated are cumulative within the GOE. For instance, a lutz jump done with an unexpected take-off, and good technique on all four phases of the jump is considered +2 (for example) but the skater flutz'ed the jump, which is -1. This would give the skater +1 GOE overall. The sole exception to this is a fall on a jump, which is an instantaneous -3 GOE on the element regardless of any other positive qualities in the jump. Following the breakdowns of the Technical Elements in the following section I list a few examples of ways the skater may receive positive or negative GOE. They are not a complete list, but merely there for quick reference.

    On any given judging panel, the computer randomly selects 7 or 9 of the judges (depending upon how many judges are on the panel) as the marks that will count in the actual points given. Out of these the highest and lowest of the marks will be thrown out and the remaining ones averaged out to give a GOE number. Sometimes the GOE is a clear cut +1.0. Sometimes it can be miniscule such as a -0.04.
    Last edited by KwanBoy23; May 17th, 2011 at 07:52 PM.

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    Default COP For Dummies! Version 2.0

    JUMP ELEMENTS
    Jumps are the majority of the Technical Elements Score for singles skaters. They are listed by the type of jump performed and how many rotations were achieved. Jumps also differ from Non-Jump Elements because they have no level. A sit spin can be performed in several different ways, can be made easy or extremely intricate. But a jump, regardless of how it is done is still a jump. A triple toe loop is a triple toe loop. It is for that reason that jumps are listed in their own area and first.

    One thing to keep in mind in regards to jumps is cheating. Cheating the jump means if you were more than 1/4 of a rotation short on the landing or if you blade was turned forward on the take-off (except in the axel jump) it was performed incorrectly. A cheated jump that is more than 1/4 a rotation short, but less than 1/2 a rotation short, is given 70% of its base value. Jumps with more than 1/2 a rotation short are called as a jump of lesser rotational value. These jumps are called under-rotated or downgraded respectively. Mandatory negative GOE is only given to downgraded jumps.

    Added a couple of seasons ago was the edge call. If a skater performs the lutz or flip on the wrong edge they will be given an edge call. There are two calls on this. An obvious edge call, which is given an "e" next to it, which is considered a mandatory -2 deduction regardless that cannot be compensated with positive jump attributes in GOE. The questoionable edge call, which is given an "!" next to it, which is considered a -1 deduction but can be compensated with positive jump attributes in GOE and is at the discretion of the judge.
    JUMPS
    Abbreviations and Base Values
    T= Toe Loop (Double= 1.3 Triple= 4.1 Quad= 10.3)
    S= Salchow (Double= 1.3 Triple= 4.2 Quad= 10.5)
    Lo= Loop (Double= 1.5 Triple= 5.1)
    F = Flip (Double= 1.7 Triple= 5.3)
    Lz = Lutz (Double= 1.9 Triple= 6.0)
    A = Axel (Double= 3.3 Triple= 8.5)
    Additional Information
    Number before the abbreviation represents how many rotations was called on the jump
    A combination will appear as 3T+3T
    A sequence will appear as 3T+3T+SEQ
    Sequences receive only 80% of the 2 jumps combined, plus or minus any GOE if they include a non-listed jump. (i.e. falling leaf, walley, etv.)
    A jump sequence that includes a half loop is considered a 3 jump combination, which the half look given loop value in base points. This sequence receives full base value.
    For combinations and sequences GOE is calculated and deducted for the highest jump ONLY in points. Therefore a triple lutz/double toe combination will get deductions based on the value for the triple lutz, even if the mistake happens on the double toe portion of the jumping pass.
    Jumps performed after the 2 minute mark receive a 1.1x multiplier
    Positive GOE Examples:
    Unexpected / creative / difficult entry, Clear recognizable steps/free skating movements immediately preceding element, Varied position in the air / delay in rotation, Great height and/or distance, Superior extension on landing / creative exit, Superior flow in and out (and in-between in jump combinations / sequences)
    Negative GOE Examples:
    Poor technique in a jump phase that is undesirable (leg wrap), telegraphed entrance, wrong take-off edge, two-footed landing, stepping out, under-rotation, fall, poor landing position
    Positive GOE for Double Axel: +0.5, +1.0, +1.5
    Positive GOE for Triple Toe to Triple Lutz: +0.7, +1.4, +2.1
    Positive GOE for Triple Axel and higher: +1.0, +2.0, +3.0
    Negative GOE for Double Axel: -0.5, -1.0, -1.5
    Negative GOE for Triple Toe to Triple Lutz: -0.7, -1.4, -2.1
    Negative GOE for Triple Axel and higher: -1.0, -2.0, -3.0
    Last edited by KwanBoy23; January 3rd, 2012 at 12:25 PM.

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    Default COP For Dummies! Spins & Spirals

    NON-JUMP ELEMENTS

    LEVELS
    All Non-Jump Elements (NJE) have a number following their abbreviation. This is a listing of the level the element received as given to them by the caller. Levels range from 1 to 4. Level 1 elements are considered the simplest or easiest version of the NJE. Level 4 elements are considered the hardest or most varied version of the NJE. Levels are increased by the addition of features. Features are variations of the NJE that are considered to add difficulty to the skill being performed. Examples of ways to increase the level are listed below but, again, the list is not complete.
    SPINS
    Abbreviations
    LSp = Layback Spin
    USp = Upright Spin
    SSp = Sit Spin
    CSp = Camel Spin
    CoSp = combination spin
    Additional Information
    F before anything means it was a flying entrance of the spin
    C before anything means it had a change of foot
    Base Values - Level (Points)[Number of Features Required for this level]
    • One Position Spin
    Level 1 (1.2) - Level 2 (1.5)[1] - Level 3 (1.8)[2] - Level 4 (2.4)[2]*
    • Layback Spin
    Level 1 (1.2) - Level 2 (1.5)[1] - Level 3 (1.8)[2] - Level 4 (2.4)[3]
    • Flying One Position Spin
    Level 1 (1.7) - Level 2 (2.0)[1] - Level 3 (2.3)[2] - Level 4 (3.0)[3]*
    • Change Foot One Position
    Level 1 (1.3) - Level 2 (1.7)[2] - Level 3 (2.1)[3] - Level 4 (3.0)[4]
    • Spin Combination
    Level 1 (1.7) - Level 2 (2.1)[2] - Level 3 (2.5)[3] - Level 4 (3.0)[4]*
    • Change Foot Spin Combination
    Level 1 (2.0) - Level 2 (2.5)[2] - Level 3 (3.0)[3] - Level 4 (3.5)[4]*
    Positive GOE Examples
    Well centered spin, maintaining speed throughout spin and changes of position, executing more than the required revolutions, good or excellent technique in 3 or more of the spin phases (preperation, entry, rotation, exit)
    Negative GOE Examples
    Recentering, poor position, noticeable slow down in speed, not meeting required revolutions, touching down with the free foot or hand
    Ways to increase Level
    Difficult Variations (Biellmann, Y-Spin, Cannonball, Broken Sit), Backwards Entrance, Difficult Flying Entrance (Normal Flying Camel doesn't count), Change of Edge, Balance of Rotations in Multiple Positions, Clear Increase of Speed
    Positive GOE for Spins: +0.5, +1.0, +1.5
    Negative GOE for Spins: -0.3, -0.6, -1.0

    STEP & SPIRAL SEQUENCES
    Abbreviations
    SlSt = Straight-line Step Sequence
    CiSt = Circular Step Sequence
    SeSt = Serpentine Step Sequence
    SpSt = Spiral Step Sequence
    Base Values - Level (Points)[Number of Features Required for this level]
    • Step Sequences
    Level 1 (1.8) - Level 2 (2.3)[2] - Level 3 (3.1)[3] - Level 4 (3.4)[4]*
    • Spiral Sequences
    Level 1 (1.8) - Level 2 (2.3)[2] - Level 3 (3.1)[3] - Level 4 (3.4)[5]
    Positive GOE Examples
    Speed maintained or accelerated during sequence, good body position and line, spirals held for more than 50% of the sequence, clear pattern with moderate or better rhythm
    Negative GOE Examples
    Incomplete pattern, stumble or slips, spirals held for less than 40% of the sequence, weak body position or line, noticeable loss of speed
    Ways to increase Level
    Step Sequence - Variety of steps, using multiple changes of direction, modest to major use of the upper body, slowing down in sequence and clear increase afterwards.

    Spiral Sequence - Difficult Variation (Catchfoot, upper body twisted), Biellmann, Change of Edge, Split Position with or without hand hold, Fan Spiral, Spirals on both legs with at least one of them being backwards, holding a position for six seconds, change of position
    Positive GOE (Level 1 to 3): +0.5, +1.0, +1.5
    Positive GOE (Level 4): +1.0, +2.0, +3.0
    Negative GOE (Level 1 & 2): -0.3, -0.6, -1.0
    Negative GOE (Level 3 & 4): -0.7, -1.4, -2.1

    NOTE: Any level feature requirements with a * next to them means there is an additional requirement in the detailed listings of features that must be met in order to attain this level. For further information please read ISU Communication 1319 located at http://www.isu.org
    Last edited by KwanBoy23; March 14th, 2010 at 10:29 AM.

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    Default COP For Dummies! Pairs

    PAIRS TECHNICAL ELEMENTS
    This section is currently still in progress and is not complete. Forgive the small mess till I get it finshed.
    JUMPS
    Pairs skaters will have jumps listed as singles skaters when performed side-by-side
    THROW JUMPS
    Abbreviations and Base Values
    TTh= Throw Toe Loop (Double= 2.5 Triple= 4.5 Quad= 8.0)
    STh= Throw Salchow (Double= 2.5 Triple= 4.5 Quad= 8.0)
    LoTh= Throw Loop (Double= 3.0 Triple= 5.0 Quad= 8.5)
    FTh = Throw Flip (Double= 3.0 Triple= 5.0)
    LzTh = Throw Lutz (Double= 3.0 Triple= 5.0)
    ATh = Throw Axel (Single= 2.0 Double= 4.0 Triple= 7.5)
    Positive GOE Examples:
    UNDER CONSTRUCTION
    Negative GOE Examples:
    UNDER CONSTRUCTION
    Positive GOE Triple Axel and Higher: +1.0, +2.0, +3.0
    Positive GOE Double Axel to Triple Lutz: +0.7, +1.4, +2.0
    Positive GOE Axel to Double Lutz: +0.5, +1.0, +1.5
    Negative GOE Double Axel and Higher: -0.7, -1.4, -2.0
    Negative GOE Axel to Double Lutz: -0.3, -0.6, -1.0

    SPINS
    Pair skaters will have spins listed as singles skaters when performed side-by-side
    PAIR SPINS
    Abbreviations
    PSp = Pair Spin
    PCoSp = Pair Combination Spin
    Base Values - Level (Points)[Number of Features Required for this level]
    • Pair Spin
    Level 1 (2.0) - Level 2 (2.5)[1] - Level 3 (3.0)[1] - Level 4 (3.5)[2]*
    • Pair Combination Spin
    Level 1 (3.0) - Level 2 (3.5)[1] - Level 3 (4.0)[2] - Level 4 (4.5)[3]*
    Positive GOE Examples
    UNDER CONSTRUCTION
    Negative GOE Examples
    UNDER CONSTRUCTION
    Ways to increase Level
    Difficult spin variation by one or both partners, if by both partners either the same or different variation, backwards entrance, multiple changes of positions by both partners, balance of difficult variations between partners
    Positive GOE: +0.5, +1.0, +1.5
    Negative GOE: -0.3, -0.6, -1.0

    STEP & SPIRAL SEQUENCES
    Pairs skaters will have step sequences listed as singles skaters.
    DEATH SPIRALS
    Abbreviations
    BoDs = Back Outside Death Spiral
    BiDs = Back Inside Death Spiral
    FoDs = Forward Outside Death Spiral
    FiDs = Forward Inside Death Spiral
    Additional Information
    Yes, Death Spirals do have levels.
    Base Values - Level (Points)[Number of Features Required for this level]
    • Forward and Backwards Inside
    Level 1 (2.8) Level 2 (3.0) Level 3 (3.2) Level 4 (3.5)
    • Forward and Backwards Outside
    Level 1 (3.0) Level 2 (3.5) Level 3 (4.0) Level 4 (4.5)
    Positive GOE Examples
    UNDER CONSTRUCTION
    Negative GOE Examples
    UNDER CONSTRUCTION
    Ways to increase Level
    Difficult entry ot exit, change of hand hold, opposite hand hold by the man, full extra revolution after the required one, change of male's pivot position, change of ladies position while in the death spiral, each direction immediately following the previous (regular and reverse)
    Positive GOE: +0.7, +1.4, +2.0
    Negative GOE: -0.7, -1.4, -2.0

    LIFTS
    Abbreviations are weird here but I will try to explain. I'm not real certain in this area, it lies outside my area of expertise, but what is common is the following. The number before the abbreviation is the group number and the number after the abreviation is the level of difficulty. Twist Lifts lie outside the majority of the other lifts. Twist Lifts do have a level but belong to no Group. Groups are based off the hold position. Position to group is as follows.
    Group 1 - Armpit Hold
    Group 2 - Waist Hold
    Group 3 - Hand to Hip
    Group 4 - Press Lift type
    Group 5 - Lasso Lift type
    Abbreviations
    Tw = Twist Lift
    Li = Any non-Group 5 Lift
    ALi = Axel type Lasso
    SLi = Step Lasso
    TLi = Toe Lasso
    RLi = Reverse Lasso (haven't seen this one listed, correct if wrong please!)
    Additional Information
    The number before a twist lift represents its rotational value
    The number before a non-twist lift represents its Group Number
    Level is represented as a number following the abbreviation
    All Group 5 Lifts have a different Abbreviation
    Base Values - Level (Points)[Number of Features Required for this level]
    • Double Twist
    Level 1 (3.0) - Level 2 (3.5)[1] - Level 3 (4.0)[2] - Level 4 (4.5)[3]*
    • Triple Twist
    Level 1 (4.0) - Level 2 (4.5)[1] - Level 3 (5.0)[2] - Level 4 (5.5)[3]*
    • Quad Twist
    Level 1 (6.0) - Level 2 (6.5)[1] - Level 3 (7.0)[2] - Level 4 (7.5)[3]*
    • Group 1 Lift
    Level 1 (1.1) - Level 2 (1.3)[2] - Level 3 (1.5)[3] - Level 4 (1.7)[4]*
    • Group 2 Lift
    Level 1 (1.3) - Level 2 (1.7)[2] - Level 3 (2.4)[3] - Level 4 (3.0)[4]*
    • Group 3 & 4 Lift
    Level 1 (2.5) - Level 2 (3.0)[2] - Level 3 (3.5)[3] - Level 4 (4.0)[4]*
    • Group 5 Lift - Non Axel Lasso
    Level 1 (4.5) - Level 2 (5.0)[2] - Level 3 (5.5)[3] - Level 4 (6.0)[4]*
    • Group 5 Lift - Axel Lasso
    Level 1 (5.0) - Level 2 (5.5)[2] - Level 3 (6.0)[3] - Level 4 (6.5)[4]*
    Positive GOE Examples
    UNDER CONSTRUCTION
    Negative GOE Examples
    UNDER CONSTRUCTION
    Ways to increase Level
    Twist Lift - Split before or after rotation, unassisted catch position (the lady does not put her hands on the man), difficult take-off, hands over head position by lady in airborne position

    Regular Lifts - variation of take-off or landing position, unexpected take-off (no preperation), change of hold, change of position, one hand hold either simple or difficult, change of rotation by man
    Positive GOE Single & Double Twist: +0.5 +1.0 +1.5
    Positive GOE Triple & Quad Twist: +0.7 +1.4 +2.0
    Positive GOE Group 1 & 2: +0.3 +0.6 +1.0
    Positive GOE Group 3, 4, & 5: +0.5 +1.0 +1.5
    Positive GOE Axel Lasso Level 1 & 2: +0.7 +1.4 +2.0
    Positive GOE Axel Lasso Level 3 & 4: +1.0 +2.0 +3.0
    Negative GOE Single & Double Twist: -0.3 -0.6 -1.0
    Negative GOE Triple & Quad Twist: -0.7 -1.4 -2.0
    Negative GOE All Non-Twist Lifts: -.03, -0.6, -1.0
    Last edited by KwanBoy23; November 23rd, 2005 at 05:59 PM.

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    Default COP For Dummies! PCS

    PROGRAM COMPONENTS
    Program Components is the assesment of the skaters overall skating ability as well as various skills and desirable qualities in skating form, program construction and performance. While the Technical Elements Score is a quantified assessment of the skaters technical skills and execution, the Program Components Score is a reflection of skating technique, program construction, performance, the ability to cover the ice with ease, and several subtle nuances that were previously under the presentation mark of the Ordinal System. To put it at simply as possible, Program Components judges the skaters overall skating ability and it is still heavily influenced by technical proficiency. But Technical Elements deals with the "tricks" while Program Components deals with the act of skating itself.

    There are five different Program Components. The judges assign a score of anywhere from 0.25 to 10.00 in each of the five areas with increments of 0.25 allowed inbetween. 5.00 is the average mark, meaning the skills involved under than Program Component were met to satisfaction. A higher number means the skills were met to a great degree, being performed above average, well, extremely well, or superior. Marks lower than average are considered below average, sub-standard, or poor.

    Unlike Grade of Execution, all of the judges marks are added together and averaged for the PCS Mark. As for why I don't know. After looking at Protocol Sheets from several different competitions I verified that fact. Do not be fooled. Every mark under PCS counts towards the averaged total.
    Program Componets - Abbreviations and Definition of Skills Involved
    SS - Skating Skills
    • Balance, rhythmic knee action, and precision of foot placement
    • Flow and effortless glide
    • Cleanness and sureness of deep edges, steps, and turns
    • Power/energy and acceleration
    • Mastery of multi directional skating
    • Mastery of one foot skating
    • Equal mastery of technique by both partners shown in unison (Pairs Only)
    TR - Transitions, Linking Footwork & Movement
    • Variety
    • Difficulty
    • Intricacy
    • Quality (including unison in Pair Skating)
    • Balance of workload between partners (Pair Skating)
    PE - Performance/Execution
    • Physical, emotional, and intellectual involvement
    • Carriage
    • Style and individuality/personality
    • Clarity of movement
    • Variety and contrast
    • Projection
    • Unison and "oneness" (Pair Skating)
    • Balance in performance (Pair Skating)
    • Spatial awareness between partners – management of the distance between partners and management of changes of hold (Pair Skating)
    CH - Choreography/Composition
    • Purpose (idea, concept, vision)
    • Proportion (equal weight of parts)
    • Unity (purposeful threading)
    • Utilization of personal and public space
    • Pattern and ice coverage
    • Phrasing and form (movements and parts structured to match the phrasing of the music)
    • Originality of purpose, movement, and design
    • Shared responsibility in achieving purpose (for Pair Skating)
    IN - Interpretation
    • Effortless movement in time to the music (timing)
    • Expression of the music’s style, character and rhythm
    • Use of "finesse"* to reflect the nuances of the music
    • Relationship between the partners reflecting the character of the music (Pair Skating)
    *Finesse is the skater’s refined, artful manipulation of nuances. Nuances are the personal artistic ways of ringing subtle variations to the intensity, tempo, and dynamics of the music made by the composer and/or musicians.
    PCS MULTIPLIER
    The total PCS mark has a multiplier depending upon what discipline is skating. The total average of each PCS Mark is multiplied to give a factored score. The multipliers for PCS for each disciplie is as follows:
    • LADIES
    Short Program: 0.8 Multiplier
    Long Program: 1.6 Multiplier
    • MEN
    Short Program: 1.0 Multiplier
    Long Program: 2.0 Multiplier
    • PAIRS
    Short Program: 0.8 Multiplier
    Long Program: 1.6 Multiplier
    Some people have wondered as to why there is a multiplier at all. Although I can't find any actual documentation giving the reason behind it I have come to this conclusion. I've assumed since the majority of senior international Men have a triple axel in their jump arsenal, are more inclined to do a triple/triple in the short program, and have an extra jumping pass in the long program, something had to be done to balance out the new "presentation" with the technical scores. Men receive more points for their PCS because they have a larger sum of TES typically in comparison to skaters in the Ladies and Pairs disciplines. The multiplier is used to make it so the TES to PCS ratio more balanced for a top level skater. If there was no multipler, the men would still come to the same results as now, whereas the majority of Ladies and Pairs skaters would win because of their higher PCS in comparison to their TES.
    PCS DEDUCTIONS
    Deduction to the Program Components Score can happen for the following reason. A fall os a mandatory -1.0 deduction from the PCS mark for every occurance. For every 1 to 5 seconds the program runs over or under the alloted time is a -1.0 deduction. Costume Violations are a -1.0 deduction. Also if any skater performs any illegal element (such as a backflip) there is a -2.0 deduction as well.
    PCS BONUS
    Under the rules there is an allotment for giving a PCS Bonus. I have yet to see s single skater receive this bonus and the rules regarding how to give out the bonus are very vague. Don't count on seeing a PCS Bonus anytime soon.
    Last edited by KwanBoy23; November 23rd, 2005 at 06:06 PM.

  7. #7
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    Default COP For Dummies! Other Stuff

    POINT TOTALS

    You may have heard some reference on television in regards to "the magic number" for a point total. While these are not documented by the ISU, nor do they address what a good point total it, the numbers themselves are in the right area.

    Going further with the assumption that a high-ranked competitor will use their best and most difficult skills combined with high scoring jumps and good program components it's easy to find a good number that represents skaters performing at the very top level. These numbers for each discipline, including whether it's for the short or long program, are outlined below.


    It is important to remember that these are reference points. You can win a competition without having these numbers and some skaters will be ahead of the curve with a great performance. Think of these totals as more of a goal, not an aboslute.
    • Ladies
    Short Program - 60 points
    Long Program - 115 points
    • Men
    Short Program - 75 points
    Long Program - 140 points
    • Pairs
    Short Program - Need Numbers
    Long Program - Need Numbers
    QUALIFYING ROUND

    The Qualifying Round is most notably used at the Senior World Championships, where there are so many skaters the ISU decided it would be good to weed out the lesser skilled skaters in the competition. If there is a Qualifying Round where the score actually counts in the overall total the Qualifying Round will be judged just like an actual Long Program. However the total points are factored at the end of this portion of the competition by 0.25. A score of 100 in the Qualifying Round would lead to a point total of 25, almost than half the average score of a Senior Ladies Short Program. The "magic number" for the qualifying round is the same as for the long program multiplied by 0.25.
    COP: Pro's and Con's
    I'm adding this in because I just now noticed I didn't cover anything in regards to the good and bad qualities of the Code of Points system. This is very important to cover because a system is only as good as the job it performs. The following are examples given by various different people, not quoted however, either through Broadcast Media, Articles, Judges, or fans on the internet.

    I think it is very important that I stress this section is up for hot debate. The examples and scenarios I am detailing tend to be the most prevailent which is why I am covering them. If you feel there is a Pro or Con to COP that is not being addressed in this guide please feel free to post your concerns or appreciations and I will be more than happy to accomidate anything that seems reasonable or fair, whether I agree with it or not.
    PROS
    The biggest thing going for COP is this one major fact. The majority of skaters themselves love it. They can look at how every aspect of their program was judged and figure out ways to improve it. Since judging most notably affects the skaters this is a huge swing into the favor of the COP System.

    Another major advantage to COP is that every element performed in a program is given value. This is also a major pro for the new system. Whereas before spins, spirals and footwork mostly seemed to go unrewarded or overlooked, now they are being paid attention to with great care. Spins have been paid attention to the most, with the various changes of edge and multiple position variations being the primary example.

    Also going for the system is the process of movement in the ranks and not being put into a factored placement. Under the Ordinal System if the skater was outside the top 3 or top 6 it made it almost impossible for them to medal. With COP we've seen skaters rocket up from as low as seventh place only to overtake the leader enough to win the entire event. Under the old system, such a changing of the guard at the top once being out of the final group was almost impossible.
    CONS
    So far the biggest thing going against the system is something the ISU has already admitted to happening. The judges are not using the PCS as they should be. Instead of them being used as a way to tell the skater exaclty how well they stack up in these five areas the judges seem to be using them as placeholders, literally a way to either prop a skater up or drag them down in the standings. Skaters with otherwise excellent skating skills and choreography but little to no tranistions in their programs are receving scores that are very near or match their superior skills in numbers. Other Skaters with the most jam-packed programs are not receiving the Choreography and Transitions marks they deserve simply because their Skating Skills and Interpretation are not up to par with the leaders of the ISU Pack. In order for this to be remidied the judges either need to be retrained or punished for not using the scores correctly. Of course it doesn't help than any judge who is outside the 10% trimmed-mean average of the panel has to answer to the ISU in regards to the discrepancy. This needs to be addressed.

    However the biggest problem with COP is the anonymous judging. While the ISU says this takes the pressure off the judges because their federations have no idea how they scored a particular skater at any event it also covers up the fact that if a judge wants to cheat there is no way for the public to tell who is responsible. If the judges are not held accountable for their actions in the open can the fans really be expected to just say "They are handling the cheating judges" when no one can tell if a judge is cheating?

    Probably the largest complaint from hundreds of online fans is the lack of variety in program. COP was supposed to make skaters more balanced to achieve the highest levels. However the current rules in regards to the grading of levels and their assignments several things were overlooked. Skaters now perform almost identical spins in both the short and long programs. Once they are proficiently good at what is considered a difficult variation it appears in every spin. And lastly, let us not overlook the Biellmann position that is being exploited not only in spins but in the spiral sequence as well for the ladies. Having a limit to the number of times a particular variation can be used would greatly increase the variety in programs, and save us from the sameness apparent in several of the top skaters programs today.
    Last edited by KwanBoy23; November 23rd, 2005 at 09:41 PM.

  8. #8
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    Default COP For Dummies! Notes and Disclaimer

    Disclaimer
    I've typed this all up myself. There was hardly any copy and pasting. This little COP for Dummies is owned by me. That's right. ME! Do not copy and paste and add it elsewhere. Feel free to link to this post (if allowed by our Moderator team and Owner) as reference from anywhere. Please do not steal this or the Skate Gods will not smile down on you and odds are $peedy will show up to give you a tea party.

    Remember that this is not a complete listing of COP and all it's intricacies. Please visit http://www.isu.org for full details down to the nitty gritty if you feel the need. I am not involved with the ISU Code of Points system nor am I a judge. Remember that. Don't blame me, don't quote me, I'm just passing information along.

    One more thing to notice about this guide. While I am posting this on my major figure skating home on the web, the Michelle Kwan Forum (MKF), this guide has absolutely nothing to do with Michelle Kwan or any regards to her skating and opinions. This guide is published as fact. Even though I am a huge fan of Michelle, as well as several other skaters, this document is used for informational purposes, not to start or incite any arguments or debates over Michelle or any other skating competitors. There is no praise or criticism of any skaters in this guide and I shall refuse to add any examples of particular skaters to avoid arguments over this documentation. This is an assesment of the rules that govern the Code of Points, not a personal playground to fight over COP and how it bodes for any particular skater, including Michelle. Please leave any complaints or praises in regards to ANY skater outside of this thread. I will not respond to, acknowledge, or cite examples of any specific skater either in this guide or in this thread. If you want to talk about the pro's and con's of COP in regards to specific skaters please be courteous and make another thread without cluttering this one up. This is COP information, end of story. I refuse to get involved in personal bias in regards to the scoring system.
    Thank You's
    I'd like to give major thanks to Heather for editing the original thread so I could multi-part it. Thanks again girl. YOU RACH! Also major thanks to Kwancierto de Aranjuez my Editor. Big payraise to you! Thanks too all the members here on the MKF for complaining so much about COP that I had to write this up as well as asking questions in this thread that lead to those things being added to this guide.

    We are still revising. When it is version 6.0 you KNOW it's completely done.

    Thanks to everyone for the praises and suggestions. There are much appreciated.

    -KwanBoy23 (Spreading Skating Technical Know-How to the MKF since January 2000)
    Last edited by KwanBoy23; November 24th, 2005 at 04:59 PM.

  9. #9
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    Default COP For Dummies!



    Just cause it's funny!

    NOTE: Foamy and Pilz-y, as they appear on my covers, are owned by Jonathan Ian Mathers, also known as IllWillPress. I do not own them. They are not mine and if so requested I will change back to the old (but boring) covers instead.
    Last edited by KwanBoy23; November 23rd, 2005 at 11:30 PM.
    "I also want millions of dollars & for Michelle to skate forever & world peace..."
    ~ aaronts

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    Default COP For Dummies! continued

    [ Reserved for future expansion ]
    Last edited by Heather; November 23rd, 2005 at 08:12 AM.
    "I also want millions of dollars & for Michelle to skate forever & world peace..."
    ~ aaronts

  11. #11

    Default

    I hope the mods will sticky this. We had a thread on the old Board with lots of COP info, but I think it got lost in the crash.
    "As it turned out, Kwan was the one who attacked the ice. In one hand, she held a saber, and in the other, a feather duster." -- 2001 World Championships (NY Times)

  12. #12

    Default COP for Dummies! - Protocol Sheet Edition

    Thanks for the informtion, KwanBoy23. Maybe this can be added to the FAQ for quick reference.

    ~Sylvia~

  13. #13
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    Default



    Thanks KwanBoy23. What a nice thing to do!
    Fan forever of Michelle Kwan - the skater and the person!
    Keeper of Mirai's 4th place at the 2010 Olympics!
    Keeper of Mirai's next National Title!

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    Default

    Addendum to Kwanboy's

    GOE = Grade of Execution
    ---, --, -, base mark, +, ++, +++
    Skaters's technical elements are evaluated with GOE with different points based on their levels.

    Levels
    Non-jump technical elements are given a value of 1 to 4 with 4 being the most difficult.

    Deductions
    Each fall a skater makes during a program is given a 1.0 deduction.
    - Kay d'Aranjuez


    "When I feel like I'm in a hut, it's the venti things in life that are important, like riding a bicycle built for two with a friend while well-padded or drinking espresso with my non-kidnapped baby niece."
    • Living My Life Like Its Golden

  15. #15

    Default

    I've stickied it Before Nationals I'll have to study this, since I know pretty much nothing about COP.

  16. #16
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    Default

    Thanks KwanBoy. I am finally getting into this. I have decided to bone up using the GP so by Nats and Olys I will be better versed in it.

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    Default Thanks Kwanboy

    That helps a lot. I'm a COP dummy and don't care who knows it. lol.

    grannie frances

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    Default

    Thanks so much for doing that. Add me to the list of COP dummies.

  19. #19

    Default

    Thanks for the "cop review".
    I have a few stupid questions.
    If I make a 3 lutz, good entrence, good exit etc... all the judges give me +2 this +2 cumulated and the value of the jump 7.5 (it's not 7.5 probl I just gave a mark) will be the score for my jump? The +2 cumulated and the jump based value?
    Wait I'm starting (maybe) to understand, when someone says he recieved +2/-2 for goe's that means this is the cumulative jugdes goe's?
    If that's it I am really............

    And all the PCS are multiplicated (sp?) with 1.6 or smth like that? What those this coeficient represent?

  20. #20
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    Default

    Edited: Information added to COP for Dummies.
    Last edited by KwanBoy23; November 24th, 2005 at 05:07 PM.
    "I also want millions of dollars & for Michelle to skate forever & world peace..."
    ~ aaronts

  21. #21

    Default

    I have a question. If a skater has lower level elements, say a level 2 spin but gets + grades can they make up points on someone that has a higher grade of elements. Thanks.

  22. #22
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    It's possible, but very hard to do, especially with a level 1 spin. In detail, in order for a spin to receive even a +1 bonus it must have 3 phases of a spin performed well. For +2 or higher all 4 phases are required to be done well. It also means spinning at a failry high speed, centered exceptionally well, for flying spins attaing the position in the air and holding it, on flying spins the landing with absollutely no moving before going into the position, and have it go well over the required amout of rotations (such as a layback requires a minimum of 8 in the short, 6 in the long, you better hold that spin at least TWICE that amount to get a good bonus.) Of course you may do enough to get that +3 but any errors are deducted as well. Having to somewhat recenter a traveling spin is -1, but a major recentring can call for a -2. So it's possible some skaters are fulfilling the positive GOE features to get +3 but have small little errors that reduce it to +1. On ANY spin, a +3 GOE (Which is basically what I would call a spin of Lucinda Ruh proportions) is an extra 1.5 points, and is enough to go from a level 2 to being comparable with a level 4 *IF* the level 4 spin was performed only to an adequate level (no + or - in the GOE). You don't have to have level 4 spins. If you have trouble with that one extra thing that bumps your spin from a level 3 to a level 4, its much better to execute the level 3 and do it well than do that level 4 and get a negative GOE IN THEORY. Of course, Lucinda doesn't skate anymore and even Alissa doesn't qualify for +3 on her spins. They are +2 quality for the most part, maybe a 3 will sneak it, but I wouldn't expect it.
    "I also want millions of dollars & for Michelle to skate forever & world peace..."
    ~ aaronts

  23. #23

    Default

    Thanks Kwanboy. This is all very interesting to read for those of us that are still learning COP.

  24. #24
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    Default

    I hope to one day make the initial post a comprehensive guide (in the simplest of terms) to understanding levels and scoring. So I'm happy this is helpful to those of you still learning. But considering that CoP is still growing itself, a whole new set of criteria may pop up next season for all we know. Understanding the basic priciples behind it let me catch up with it (so to speak) when it changed.

    Edited: Second part of post removed. Added to COP for Dummies.
    Last edited by KwanBoy23; November 24th, 2005 at 05:08 PM.

  25. #25

    Default

    oh thanks for posting this! it helped me a lot...i was pretty confused for a while. lol.

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