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Thread: Amusing MKM

  1. #1

    Default Amusing MKM

    This brief MK mention caught my eye. Not so much because of Michelle per se (a local skater was inspired by Michelle to take up skating as a young girl), but because of the name of the on-line newspaper in which the article appeared: The Easton (Mass) Wicked Local.

    http://easton.wickedlocal.com/news/2...les-to-crayons

    I found out that there are a whole bunch of “Wicked Locals” scattered throughout New England. I was so curious about the name that I wrote to the parent organization and asked about it. Here is the response I got, in part.

    That is actually a great question!

    While I do not have an official origin story for the name "Wicked Local," my best guess is that it's because that newspaper group comprises smaller, locally (as opposed to nationally) focused weekly publications and that the word "wicked" in Massachusetts is slang for "very" or "really."

    So, "Wicked Local newspapers" is like saying "Very local newspapers."
    I Googled “wicked slang Massachusetts” and found out that this is right. New Englanders say things like, It’s wicked cold today and He’s wicked smart, meaning “very.”

    I wonder if Rhode Islander Michelle has picked this up?
    Last edited by Mathman2; February 24th, 2017 at 05:27 AM.

  2. #2

    Default

    Thanks Mathman2!
    As a one-time New Englander, I can confirm the veracity of this colloquialism.
    Usage reached a broader audience through the movie "Good Will Hunting."
    https://youtu.be/DyF0tR6cQA4

  3. #3

    Heart

    Thanks, Mathman! I love it when you become all teacher--like!

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Herr Drosselmeier View Post
    As a one-time New Englander, I can confirm the veracity of this colloquialism.
    Usage reached a broader audience through the movie "Good Will Hunting."
    Quote Originally Posted by teach23 View Post
    Thanks, Mathman! I love it when you become all teacher--like!
    *Ahem* With that encouragement I will go on to mention the following. The mathematics problem that Will Hunting solved in the movie was taken from the PhD dissertation (1959) of my good friend and long-time colleague Geert Prins. Prins' thesis advisor was the great pioneer of graph theory, Frank Harary at the University of Michigan. Both are sadly deceased now, but in the 1960s they wrote a number of joint papers on the topic appearing in the movie.

    And what do you think of that, Michelle?

  5. #5

    Default

    . . .
    \._|_./
    ./ . \.
    . / \.

    I nominate Mathman2 for the Fields [of Gold] Medal!
    Last edited by Herr Drosselmeier; February 24th, 2017 at 11:16 PM. Reason: ASCII is messed up, but you get the idea.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Herr Drosselmeier View Post
    . . .
    \._|_./
    ./ . \.
    . / \.

    I nominate Mathman2 for the Fields [of Gold] Medal!
    I second that motion.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    The O.C.
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    2,564

    Default

    All in favor, say, "Smiral"!

  8. #8

    Default

    Smiral!!!

  9. #9

    Default

    I agree! Smiral!

  10. #10

    Default

    Ah, shucks, y'all.

  11. #11

    Default

    Smiral.....Smiral.....

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    309

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mathman2 View Post
    New Englanders say things like, It’s wicked cold today and He’s wicked smart, meaning “very.”
    I've heard the phrase "wicked cold" and "wicked smart" way down in Philadelphia (not technically part of New England). Sometimes people just say, "It's wicked outside today!"

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